Soundproof Windows, Sliding Glass Doors and Recording Studios
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Frequently Asked Questions

Features of Soundproof Windows

What kind of insulation values do Soundproof Windows have?

What do you mean by "earthquake-safe" windows?

What is laminated glass?

Soundproof Windows block out the sun's UV rays. Is that very important?

Will this fix my old, leaking windows?

Will I get condensation?


What kind of insulation values do Soundproof Windows have?
Soundproof Windows have superior insulation values: our two-window system has better insulation values than any single window system. Most windows are only designed for insulation (
not for sound) and the two are very different.

Fortunately, what works for sound, works even better for insulation. Soundproof Windows are sealed better than replacement windows. When combined with the excellent insulation values, Soundproof Windows offer you the best reduction in unwanted air infiltration, draftiness, and any cold drafts or hot spots within your home.

Our windows have better insulation values than the best low-e, argon gas filled double paned window you can buy. Our R-values range from 3.0 to over 5.5.

For more information, please see our Insulation Values page.

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What do you mean by "earthquake-safe" windows?
One of the dangers in an earthquake is the flying glass from windows breaking. Earthquakes can shatter the glass of a normal window and send it flying everywhere. It would be dangerous to move around bare-footed and you could be injured by the flying glass. Soundproof Windows are made of laminated glass, which can break, but will stay in place at your window. Please see our page outlining some of the features of laminated glass.

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What is laminated glass?

Laminated glass is two pieces of glass sandwiched together with a special plastic inner layer, which glues them together, stops vibrations, blocks UV light and prevents the glass from breaking into many pieces when it is broken. When it does break, it stays together - like your car's front windshield, which is also laminated glass.

Graphic showing how laminated glass is constructed

 Qualities:

  • Soundproofing
  • Security
  • Filters out UV Light
  • Strength





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Soundproof Windows block out the sun's UV rays. Is that very important?
Yes and No. Ultraviolet light causes sunburn, color fading and deterioration of natural and synthetic materials.

Museums always use laminated glass to provide color fade protection, as do most furniture stores.

The inner layer of plastic used in our laminated glass blocks 99.9% of all the UV light from passing through. On the other hand, standard glass (used in almost all commercial and residential applications) blocks very little UV light. Even the newer "low E" glass cannot compete with the UV protection of laminated glass.

Some of our customers buy our windows not for sound, but for the UV protection. It is a benefit that may or may not be important to you. It does not harm plants to not get UV rays.

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Will this fix my old, leaking windows?
If they are leaking water, NO. If they are leaking air, creating drafts, etc., YES - definitely. Here is some additional information on air infiltration and drafts and how Soundproof Windows can improve your situation.

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Will I get condensation?

Condensation is a very complicated issue, especially in some areas with all the fog and various climates. It is not just a cold-weather question like it would be in Montana. Soundproof Windows will reduce condensation, maybe enough to stop all of it, maybe not, but it will be a big improvement. If your current window does not leak a lot of air, then we may resolve your condensation problem completely.

For more information about the benefits of Soundproof Windows with respect to condensation, please see our page on Stopping Condensation.

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